The Ladies Billionaires Want – Jyoti and Kiran Matharoo – Talk Prison, Money & Billionaires

0

After years of romances with a series of fabulously wealthy Nigerian boyfriends, the flamboyant Canadian sisters Jyoti and Kiran Matharoo needed somewhere to store the pricey spoils of their dating careers. So they converted a bedroom in their Toronto home into a large walk-in closet that resembles a luxury boutique.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by K I R A N M A T H A R O O (@kiran_matharoo) on

An entire wall is lined with more than 70 pairs of designer high-heeled shoes. Glass wardrobes display dozens of handbags and purses from brands like Hermès, Celine, Gucci and Saint Laurent. Equally pricey clothing drapes tightly from hangers and fills trunks stacked up to the ceiling.

There are separate drawers for belts, rings, earrings, bracelets, silver necklaces and gold ones. They own a collection of rose gold and diamond-encrusted watches easily worth several cars. And the white Mercedes-Benz sedan parked outside? It’s their third paid for by a wealthy paramour, they said.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by J Y O T I M Λ T H Λ R O O (@jyotimatharoo) on

Did they even pay for any of this stuff? “Not really, no,” said Jyoti, 34. Her sister responded similarly. “The only time I go shopping is when someone gives me their credit card,” said Kiran, 32.

Armed with this luxury haul, the Matharoos have tried to copy the modern art of idle glamour pioneered by Paris Hilton and perfected by Kim Kardashian West. They followed the playbook so effectively that they are sometimes called the “Canadian Kardashians” for their devotion to spandex bodysuits, private jet travel, Christian Louboutin and social media.

But if their reality-television muses are famous for being shamelessly rich, the Matharoos became notorious after their unapologetic pursuit of material excess backfired, exploding into a messy international scandal involving one of the world’s richest men, a salacious gossip website, stints in Nigerian and Italian custody, and a battle to clear their names with Interpol, the global police organization.

When the dark side of the fantasy arrived — this was in Lagos, in December 2016 — it was as sudden as it was severe.

A few days after the Matharoos had returned to Nigeria, they were awakened by a loud knocking at their hotel room door. A group of men burst in and told the women they had to come to the police station. Some of the men, who turned out to be plainclothes police officers, took photos of the sisters in their bathrobes. These soon appeared online. The sisters asked to see a warrant and a badge but got no response.

“I told them I’m going to call my embassy, but when I started dialing, one guy grabbed the phone out of my hand,” Jyoti said. “They said if we don’t get dressed, they were going to carry us out just like that.”

“We thought we were being kidnapped,” Kiran said.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by J Y O T I M Λ T H Λ R O O (@jyotimatharoo) on

At the police station, the officers kept asking if the sisters owned a gossip website that had been spreading scandalous rumors about Nigerian elites — and about the sisters themselves. This site was among the blogs that had described them as prostitutes. “We couldn’t help but laugh, because the whole thing was so ridiculous,” Jyoti said.

From there, the sisters said they were driven in a van to another police station, this one belonging to Nigeria’s Special Anti-Robbery Squad, a branch of the police notorious for corruption and using torture to extract confessions, according to a 2016 report by Amnesty International. They were taken to a dimly lit office where an officer, seated behind a wooden desk, demanded they write statements admitting that they owned the gossip website.

“The site was in Nigerian Pidgin,” Jyoti said. “We can’t speak Pidgin, so of course we refused.”

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by K I R A N M A T H A R O O (@kiran_matharoo) on

After hours of arguing, officers pushed the tearful sisters into what they described as a rat-infested jail cell filled with a dozen women, a few pieces of foam for beds and a hole in the floor for a toilet. The next day, they said, officers brought them back to their hotel room, and took their passports, electronics and Nigerian currency worth more than $11,000 from the safe.

The women were then driven to a hotel by the airport and locked in a room with bars on the windows and guards outside the door. They said some of the men demanded bribes. “It was like we were held hostage,” Kiran said.

To read more check out the article in full here via The New York Times

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by J Y O T I M Λ T H Λ R O O (@jyotimatharoo) on

Share.

About Author

Leave A Reply

error: Content is protected !!